Six (6) Android Games You Should Play Now not Tomorrow

Got a new device? You need to get some new games. Here are some quick recommendations for great Android games. Some are familiar from other platforms. Some are free. Some are paid, and some have specific hardware requirements. All are listed here.
1.  Minecraft Pocket Edition
Why it is great: Minecraft is an entertaining block-building and survival game. You can play either in creative mode where you build and invent things in your own randomly generated world or you can play in survival mode where you use your wits and resources to survive against the creepers who come out at night.
Note – this does not connect with your main Minecraft account if you play the computer version of the game.
Play for yourself or keep it around to entertain kids. (Turn off in-app purchases if you do this.)
Minecraft is a paid app ($6.99) but you can find occasional sales, in-app purchases run from $0.50 to $1.99.   More »
2.  Lara Croft Go
Based on the popular Tomb Raider series and developed by Square Enix, Lara Craft Go is a relatively simple but very addictive puzzle game you can take with you. The puzzles are designed for short bursts of play, so pull it out in the doctor’s office waiting room or while riding the bus home.
Lara Croft Go sells for $4.99 but is occasionally on sale for $0.99. It allows in-app purchases. If you like this game, you can also check out Hitman Go, which is also from Square Enix.  More »
 
3.  Buttons and Scissors
This is a free puzzle game where you try to cut matching color buttons off of a square of denim. Mechanically this feels similar to Bejeweled, but not completely the same. The logic puzzles offer great challenges for players of all ages.
The other big advantage to this game is that it does not require any connectivity. You can play this game on devices that aren’t connected to Wi-Fi or in that signal dead spot.
Buttons and Scissors is a free download but allows in-app purchases.  More »
 Did you want to try out the new trend in adult coloring books, but you don’t want to carry around coloring pencil and a coloringb book? Try out this app instead. It’s appropriate for kids or adults, and while it’s not the same as coloring in an actual coloring book, it is still very satisfying.
Mandala Coloring Pages is free (with ads) but also allows in-app purchases.  More »
Yes. You can play an Android version of Portal. This is a real console game. As such, it requires a real console. This version will only work on the Nvidia Shield version of Android TV.  The Nvidia Shield starts at around $199 but allows you to stream movies and play Android games on your TV.
Portal starts at $1.99 but this is “introductory pricing.”  More »
If you have a phone with a fast processor and terrific screen display, you can take it for a ride with this virtual reality game. This is a first-person shooter where you aim at balloons. You’ll need Google Cardboard. This is an inexpensive accessory that you can either make or buy for around $15 and will turn your phone into a virtual reality device. Obviously not a game you can play while waiting in a doctor’s office (unless your doctor is awesome) but a fun novelty game to play by yourself or after having one of your friends try on the headset.
VR Cardboard Shooter 3D is a free download.  More »









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 We do not receive payment for positive reviews.

Unix / Linux shortcut keys

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Unix / Linux shortcut keys

Quick links
Introduction
Shortcuts are designed to help shorten the time required to perform frequently used commands or actions. In the below sections we have listed keyboard shortcut keys that can be performed by pressing two or more keys at once. In addition to keyboard shortcut keys, we have also listed command line shortcut keys that can be typed in at the shell.
Please note that the below shortcut keys and command line shortcuts will not work on all variants of Unix and/or Linux.
Keyboard shortcut keys
CTRL + B
Moves the cursor backward one character.
CTRL + C
Cancels the currently running command.
CTRL + D
Logs out of the current session.
CTRL + F
Moves the cursor forward one character.
CTRL + H
Erase one character. Similar to pressing backspace.
CTRL + P
Paste previous line and/or lines.
CTRL + S
Stops all output on screen (XOFF).
CTRL + Q
Turns all output stopped on screen back on (XON).
CTRL + U
Erases the complete line.
CTRL + W
Deletes the last word typed in. For example, if you typed ‘mv file1 file2’ this shortcut would delete file2.
CTRL + Z
Cancels current operation, moves back a directory and/or takes the current operation and moves it to the background. See bg command down the page for additional information about background.
Command line shortcuts

In addition to the below command line shortcuts, it is also helpful to use the alias command that allows you to specify a keyword for frequently used commands or mistakes.

~
Moves to the user’s home directory.
!!
Repeats the line last entered at the shell. See history command for previous commands.
!$
Repeats the last argument for the command last used. See history command for previous commands. down
reset
Resets the terminal if terminal screen is not displaying correctly.
shutdown -h now
Remotely or locally shuts the system down.
Linux / Unix background command
About bg
Continues a stopped job in the background. This function is not available on all Unix shell’s.
Syntax
bg [-l] [-p] [-x] [job]
-l
Report the process group ID and working directory of the jobs.
-p
Report only the process group ID of the jobs.
-x
Replace any job_id found in command or arguments with the corresponding process  group ID, and then execute command passing it arguments.
job
Specifies the job that you want to run in the background.
Examples
bg  – Lists the current running jobs.
Below is a listing of how to determine the type of job when looking at the job listing.
% or %+ or %%
for the current job.
%- or –
for the previous job.
Technical support
What causes stopped jobs?
Generally a stopped job will occur if the connection is interrupted or the commanded is interrupted with TSTP signals (typically CTRL + Z).
Linux / Unix face and history command
About fc and history
The ‘fc’ utility lists or edits and re-executes, commands previously entered to an interactive sh.
The ‘history’ utility allows you to use words from previous command lines in the command line you are typing. This simplifies spelling corrections and the repetition of complicated commands or arguments.
Syntax
CSH – C SHELL
history [-h] [-r] [n]
!
Start a history substitution, except when followed by a space character, tab, newline, = or (.
!!
Runs the last command that you ran.
!10
Re-run line number 10 in the history.
!-n
Refer to the current command line minus n.
!?str?
Refer to the most recent command containing str (string).
!str
Re runs the last command that you ran that starts with str (string).
KSH – KORN SHELL
fc [-e editor] [-n] [-l] [-r] [-s] [ first [ last ] ]
 
-e editor
Use the editor named by editor to edit the commands. The editor string is a utility name, subject to search via the PATH variable. The value in the FCEDIT variable is used as a default when -e is not specified. If FCEDIT is null or unset, ed will be used as the editor.
-n
Suppress command numbers when listing with -l.
-l
List the commands rather than invoking an editor on them. The commands will be written in the sequence indicated by the first and last operands, as affected by -r, with each command preceded by the command number.
-r
Reverse the order of printout to be most recent first rather than oldest first.
-s
Re-execute the command without invoking an editor.
first [last]
Select the commands to list or edit. The number of previous commands that can be accessed is determined by the value of the HISTSIZE variable. The value of first or last or both will be one of the following:
[+]number
 A positive number representing a command number; command numbers can be displayed with the -l option.
-number
A negative decimal number representing the command that was executed number of commands previously. For example, -1 is the immediately previous command.
string
A string indicating the most recently entered command that begins with that string. If the old=new operand is not also specified with -s, the string form of the first operand cannot contain an embedded equal sign.
Examples
Fc:
fc -l – Would list the history of commands on the computer similar to the following:
2 grep –help
3 bg
4 fg
5 pine
6 cd public_html
7 rm index.html
8 sz index.html
9 ls -laxo
10 chmod 755 index.htm
fc -e – ls – Would execute the last ls command.
History:
history – Typing history alone would give results similar to the following:
2 grep –help
3 bg
4 fg
5 pine
6 cd public_html
7 rm index.html
8 sz index.html
9 ls -laxo
10 chmod 755 index.htm
!ls – Would execute the last ls command.
!! – Would execute the last command executed.









Disclosure: This page may contain external affiliate links that may result in us receiving
 a commission if you choose to purchase said product. The opinions on this page are our own.
 We do not receive payment for positive reviews.

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