Six (6) Android Games You Should Play Now not Tomorrow

Got a new device? You need to get some new games. Here are some quick recommendations for great Android games. Some are familiar from other platforms. Some are free. Some are paid, and some have specific hardware requirements. All are listed here.
1.  Minecraft Pocket Edition
Why it is great: Minecraft is an entertaining block-building and survival game. You can play either in creative mode where you build and invent things in your own randomly generated world or you can play in survival mode where you use your wits and resources to survive against the creepers who come out at night.
Note – this does not connect with your main Minecraft account if you play the computer version of the game.
Play for yourself or keep it around to entertain kids. (Turn off in-app purchases if you do this.)
Minecraft is a paid app ($6.99) but you can find occasional sales, in-app purchases run from $0.50 to $1.99.   More »
2.  Lara Croft Go
Based on the popular Tomb Raider series and developed by Square Enix, Lara Craft Go is a relatively simple but very addictive puzzle game you can take with you. The puzzles are designed for short bursts of play, so pull it out in the doctor’s office waiting room or while riding the bus home.
Lara Croft Go sells for $4.99 but is occasionally on sale for $0.99. It allows in-app purchases. If you like this game, you can also check out Hitman Go, which is also from Square Enix.  More »
 
3.  Buttons and Scissors
This is a free puzzle game where you try to cut matching color buttons off of a square of denim. Mechanically this feels similar to Bejeweled, but not completely the same. The logic puzzles offer great challenges for players of all ages.
The other big advantage to this game is that it does not require any connectivity. You can play this game on devices that aren’t connected to Wi-Fi or in that signal dead spot.
Buttons and Scissors is a free download but allows in-app purchases.  More »
 Did you want to try out the new trend in adult coloring books, but you don’t want to carry around coloring pencil and a coloringb book? Try out this app instead. It’s appropriate for kids or adults, and while it’s not the same as coloring in an actual coloring book, it is still very satisfying.
Mandala Coloring Pages is free (with ads) but also allows in-app purchases.  More »
Yes. You can play an Android version of Portal. This is a real console game. As such, it requires a real console. This version will only work on the Nvidia Shield version of Android TV.  The Nvidia Shield starts at around $199 but allows you to stream movies and play Android games on your TV.
Portal starts at $1.99 but this is “introductory pricing.”  More »
If you have a phone with a fast processor and terrific screen display, you can take it for a ride with this virtual reality game. This is a first-person shooter where you aim at balloons. You’ll need Google Cardboard. This is an inexpensive accessory that you can either make or buy for around $15 and will turn your phone into a virtual reality device. Obviously not a game you can play while waiting in a doctor’s office (unless your doctor is awesome) but a fun novelty game to play by yourself or after having one of your friends try on the headset.
VR Cardboard Shooter 3D is a free download.  More »









Disclosure: This page may contain external affiliate links that may result in us receiving
 a commission if you choose to purchase said product. The opinions on this page are our own.
 We do not receive payment for positive reviews.

Microsoft millionaires unleashed: 12 Microsoft alums who spent their money in the most magnificent ways

78
Microsoft millionaires unleashed: 12 Microsoft alums who spent their money in the most magnificent ways

For those lucky enough to hitch their wagons to Microsoft early on in its meteoric rise to the top of the computing market, the payoff was huge.
Some analysts estimate that thanks to the stock options the company gave to early employees, Microsoft has created three billionaires and as many as 12,000 millionaires. And even for those who didn’t quite get to those heights, the rewards were huge.

Here’s a look at what some of Microsoft’s most successful alumni have done with their post-Redmond lives, from fine art to spaceflight.

BILL GATES

Bill Gates, the world’s richest man, is a huge collector of rare books and paintings. In 1998, he set a record for American art when he paid $36 million for Winslow Homer’s “Lost on the Grand Banks.”

Winslow Homer’s “Lost on the Grand Banks.”



Former CEO Steve Ballmer was reportedly interested in bringing an NBA team back to Seattle, but when those plans fell through he dropped $2 billion on the Los Angeles Clippers. Fortunately, the value of his Microsoft stock rose $3.2 billion in 2013 alone, so his pockets were definitely deep enough.

Microsoft cofounder Paul Allen owns two pro sports teams — the Seattle Seahawks and the Portland Trailblazers, plus he’s a part owner of Major League Soccer’s Seattle Sounders. And he owns a massive yacht with a submarine on board. Take that, Ballmer.

Charles Simonyi oversaw the creation of Microsoft Office and was at the company until 2002. Now he’s a space-obsessed billionaire who took two trips to the International Space Station.



Bob Greenberg left Microsoft in 1981, well before its IPO, and would go on to help create the creepy-but-popular Cabbage Patch Kid dolls that were all the rage in the mid-1980s.

These days, he’s working in software again, after his brief interlude in making hit toys.

Gabe Newell was a producer on the first three versions of Microsoft Windows, and he was already a millionaire when he left the company in 1996. Now Newell is the head of Valve Software, and a hero to gamers everywhere, who affectionately call him “Gaben.”

Former Microsoft CTO Nathan Myhrvold has a reputation as a renaissance man. He used his Microsoft millions to found a firm that specializes in intellectual property and patents, and he’s a renowned nature photographer and trained physicist who once worked with Stephen Hawking. But he’s probably best known for his comprehensive and unusual 600-plus page cookbook, “Modernist Cuisine,” which has sold at least $30 million worth of copies.

Richard “Quiet Lion” Brodie, was the original author of Microsoft Word and Bill Gates’ former assistant. He left Microsoft in 1994 to pursue a career as a self-help book author and a professional poker player. He even went on Oprah once.

Ex-Microsoft employees Chris Peters, Mike Slade, and future RealNetworks founder Rob Glaser teamed up to buy the Professional Bowlers Association, for no other reason than they could. When they left in 1999, Microsoft stock was hitting some all-time highs ahead of a 2:1 stock split.

RealNetworks founder and Microsoft millionaire Rob Glaser.

Brad Silverberg used his Microsoft millions to go into venture capital at Ignition Partners alongside a bunch of other Microsoft millionaires, funding hot enterprise startups like Wit.ai and Xamarin.



Andrea Lewis was a Microsoft technical writer, estimated to be worth $2 million. She used her millions to open the Richard Hugo House, a literary center in Seattle.

Seattle’s Richard Hugo House.

Jim Allchin was a key part of getting Windows 98, XP, and Vista out the door as a Microsoft executive. Nowadays, he’s a renowned blues guitarist and singer, with his third album, 2013’s Q.E.D., garnering critical acclaim.

SHARE THIS WONDERFUL ARTICLE TO YOUR FRIENDS…

SOURCE: BUSINESS INSIDER








Disclosure: This page may contain external affiliate links that may result in us receiving
 a commission if you choose to purchase said product. The opinions on this page are our own.
 We do not receive payment for positive reviews.

Subscribe to our newsletter
Sign up here to get the latest news, updates and special offers delivered directly to your inbox.
You can unsubscribe at any time
Comments