Six (6) Android Games You Should Play Now not Tomorrow

Got a new device? You need to get some new games. Here are some quick recommendations for great Android games. Some are familiar from other platforms. Some are free. Some are paid, and some have specific hardware requirements. All are listed here.
1.  Minecraft Pocket Edition
Why it is great: Minecraft is an entertaining block-building and survival game. You can play either in creative mode where you build and invent things in your own randomly generated world or you can play in survival mode where you use your wits and resources to survive against the creepers who come out at night.
Note – this does not connect with your main Minecraft account if you play the computer version of the game.
Play for yourself or keep it around to entertain kids. (Turn off in-app purchases if you do this.)
Minecraft is a paid app ($6.99) but you can find occasional sales, in-app purchases run from $0.50 to $1.99.   More »
2.  Lara Croft Go
Based on the popular Tomb Raider series and developed by Square Enix, Lara Craft Go is a relatively simple but very addictive puzzle game you can take with you. The puzzles are designed for short bursts of play, so pull it out in the doctor’s office waiting room or while riding the bus home.
Lara Croft Go sells for $4.99 but is occasionally on sale for $0.99. It allows in-app purchases. If you like this game, you can also check out Hitman Go, which is also from Square Enix.  More »
 
3.  Buttons and Scissors
This is a free puzzle game where you try to cut matching color buttons off of a square of denim. Mechanically this feels similar to Bejeweled, but not completely the same. The logic puzzles offer great challenges for players of all ages.
The other big advantage to this game is that it does not require any connectivity. You can play this game on devices that aren’t connected to Wi-Fi or in that signal dead spot.
Buttons and Scissors is a free download but allows in-app purchases.  More »
 Did you want to try out the new trend in adult coloring books, but you don’t want to carry around coloring pencil and a coloringb book? Try out this app instead. It’s appropriate for kids or adults, and while it’s not the same as coloring in an actual coloring book, it is still very satisfying.
Mandala Coloring Pages is free (with ads) but also allows in-app purchases.  More »
Yes. You can play an Android version of Portal. This is a real console game. As such, it requires a real console. This version will only work on the Nvidia Shield version of Android TV.  The Nvidia Shield starts at around $199 but allows you to stream movies and play Android games on your TV.
Portal starts at $1.99 but this is “introductory pricing.”  More »
If you have a phone with a fast processor and terrific screen display, you can take it for a ride with this virtual reality game. This is a first-person shooter where you aim at balloons. You’ll need Google Cardboard. This is an inexpensive accessory that you can either make or buy for around $15 and will turn your phone into a virtual reality device. Obviously not a game you can play while waiting in a doctor’s office (unless your doctor is awesome) but a fun novelty game to play by yourself or after having one of your friends try on the headset.
VR Cardboard Shooter 3D is a free download.  More »









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Interview techniques that get results

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Do you think first impressions are accurate, or are you often surprised by how people turn out to be?

If you’re interviewing someone for a job, for example, or an agency to work on a project, how can you judge them on the basis of a short interview? The fact is, until you’ve spent time with someone, it’s difficult to find out what they are “really like”.

Luckily, communication skills can help. And, of course, they can be used in all social situations.
 

1. First impressions aren’t always right
Quite often we judge people within the first few minutes of meeting them.  But don’t be too influenced by first impressions. What people look like, what they’re wearing, their accents and their haircuts can tell you a lot – but they certainly don’t tell the whole story.

Interview situation: To get below the surface of someone in a short time, it’s essential to approach them with an open mind. Make a list of the character stereotypes you’re influenced by – such as, “people who wear glasses are clever” or “fat people are easy-going and happy” – and then think about how rational these preconceptions really are. If you form a negative first impression just because of the way they look or speak, you might miss the fact that they are experienced and professional and would do a great job in your team.

2. Relax and smile
Most of us are a bit shy when we meet new people. So if someone has a sweaty handshake, sits right on the edge of their chair and seems ill at ease, it probably just means they don’t feel comfortable in the social situation. To put them at their ease, show you’re interested in them; talk calmly and smile. Once they are relaxed, and start to trust you, they will open up and reveal more of their true nature.

Interview situation: Non-threatening body language signals help other people relax and reveal more about themselves, their personal goals and their intentions. Be aware of yourself and the impression you give: relax your face and shoulders, speak calmly, and draw them out gradually, starting with easy questions and small talk. Remember: if they seem uncomfortable, it is partly because of you.



3. Consider body language
Broadly speaking, you can see whether someone is a relaxed or a nervous type from the way they hold their body and from their facial gestures. For example, we exhibit interest and openness by directly facing the person we’re talking to, tilting our faces towards them, maintaining steady eye contact, smiling, and keeping our hands, arms and legs uncrossed. However, don’t read too much into this unless you know a person well enough to be familiar with their normal patterns. Body language is strongly based on culture: what’s normal in one culture or social group may be unacceptable in another. This is not a real science.

Interview situation: In an interview, when you have so little time, anything that can help build up an impression of a person is useful. For example, notice a few details about how they use their bodies, hands, faces and especially their eyes – do they have a confident, firm handshake or a flabby one? Is their body facing you, or turned away? Do they look at you confidently when they speak or avoid your eyes? However, remember that although we’re good at recognizing facial expressions, it’s hard to tell whether these expressions are genuine or not. The best way to learn how to “read” people is to spend time in different social settings – or, as David Funder of the University of California at Riverside says: “A good judge of personality isn’t just someone who is smarter – it’s someone who gets out and spends time with people.”[1]

4. Ask follow-up questions
Asking questions is a sign of interest in another person, though in some cultures it’s more acceptable to ask direct or personal questions than in others. However, generally speaking, if you’re talking to someone and they don’t ask you a single question, then the normal conclusion to draw is that they aren’t really interested in you. To avoid giving this impression, make sure you ask questions – and then listen to the answers!

Interview situation: A good interviewer asks lots of follow-up questions and asks for explanations. So don’t be afraid to probe the applicant and press them for details: your second and third questions, the ones that get below the surface, will elicit the most revealing and honest answers. Avoid those that only need a yes/no answer. For example, you can say, “That sounds interesting. Why did you decide to do that?” or, “How did you approach that? Can you give me some examples?” or, “What happened then?” This gives the job candidate the chance to open up (and if they don’t, that will also tell you something about them).

With these basic communication skills, we can learn a great deal about other people, even if the time we can spend with them is limited. Learning to listen and to ask the right questions builds trust and encourages people to reveal their true personalities and intentions. And that way, we shouldn’t be in for too many shocks at a later date.








Disclosure: This page may contain external affiliate links that may result in us receiving
 a commission if you choose to purchase said product. The opinions on this page are our own.
 We do not receive payment for positive reviews.

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